Acer Aspire one Netbook-D250-1414

Comments

19 comments

  • Forrest Smith

    James,

    Glad to hear it! Hope she has fun with it!

  • shawn

    Hi. I have the exact model and all I seem to get is a grey screen with a black mouse and then the netbook hibernates.

    How did you get it working?

    Thanks for your post and time.

  • Forrest Smith

    Shawn,

     

    You sure you don't have a D270? 

  • james r

    I sent the Netbook off. But all I can say is that the install went smoothly. I didn't do anything extra or extraordinary. Just followed the instructions. 

     

    Good luck

  • Shawn Hobbs

    I'm postive that I have the D250. In fact I have a few models of the aspire one which is why I'm certain.

    I called Neverware and they said the D250 is not supported. When I saw your post, I had to ask.

     

    Sorry for the late reply, this is a hobby project and I'm just getting back to it.

     

    Thank you for your response.

  • Forrest Smith

    Shawn - 

     

    Try again with v46 and, if you can manage it, a different installer stick. Maybe that'd do it? 

  • Jim O'Neill

    I just installed CloudReady on my D250 also.  I don't know if it is the 1414 submodel mentioned in the header.  Anyway all I did was 1) upgrade to 2GB RAM (somewhere on this site it says this is the minimum), and 2) make sure I had the latest BIOS from the Acer site.  Then following the instructions on this website to make a bootable USB and install Cloudready went very smoothly.  The only other wrinkle I can add is that in the D250 Bios, there is no option to boot from a USB stick.  But I just selected boot from a USB hard disk and that worked perfectly.

    Although installation was good though, I'm not too impressed with the performance so far. I am getting very slow internet speeds which makes a cloud based operating system very sluggish.  I don't know if this is because this model is unsupported by Neverware so the driver for the wireless is not optimized?  But arguing against that is that the performance is sluggish even when on a wired internet connection. So far ,the user experience is worse than continuing with the original Windows XP this Netbook came with, or running Linux Mint XFCE.

     

    I will persevere a little longer but so far it also seems very difficult to dig down to the driver level to see what is happening.

     

  • Forrest Smith

    Jim - 

     

    Happy to have you kicking the tires on CloudReady.

     

    Sadly, Atom processors and the associated GPUs are not well optimized in Linux, and so are in a small category of machines that can show some performance lag as compared to a fresh Windows install.
     
    Many people still like to switch because it helps them easily dispense with the baggage of Windows, but if the performance won't work for you we'd definitely encourage you to go with the OS that does.
  • shawn

    Reinstalling with version v46 with a different stick did the trick..

    Thanks everyone for all your help.

  • Jim O'Neill

    Thats interesting about potential compatibility issues with Atom processors.  A couple of comments though - the D257 netbook which is one of your recommended systems has an Atom processor with almost exactly the same CPU benchmark score (284 vs 272).  Also I'm not sure it is a Linux/Atom compatibility issue, the same Netbook works great with Linux Mint, subjectively the performance on Mint is about the same as Windows XP.   I'm still tempted to ascribe it to the internet connection speeds - on wireless I was only getting ~10MB/s download speed when a few feet from my router, at the same location a more modern Netbook on Windows 10 gives me ~27MB/s.  Even when wired I only got 26MB/s from the Cloudready Netbook, where other machines give me 130MB/s.  I'm going to reinstall Windows XP and see if the connection speeds increase. 

  • Forrest Smith

    Jim,

     

    It isn't that all Atoms are incompatible, just that drivers are less optimized on Linux for GMA3XXX graphics since they are PowerVR based.

     

    From your description, network does sound like it could be poorly driven. Which version number do you have installed?

  • Jim O'Neill

    Its the latest version downloaded from your website a couple of days ago.  Version 47.??? - I don't remember the numbers after the 47 and the machine is currently in the process of having Windows re-installed to see how the internet connection speeds look there, so I can't check.

    Just to give you an idea how slow it was, the time taken from clicking on Google docs to being able to enter the first character in a blank document was 21s even with a wired connection.

    Loading web pages was slow also.  The time taken to open the browser, and open 2 new pages (Outlook and the local weather forecast) as well as the initial home page was 20s.  Again this was done with a wired connection.

     

     

  • Forrest Smith

    Jim - 

     

    That definitely sounds like something's wrong. We'll have to keep an eye out for wifi optimization failures here in house. Love to hear more comparisons as you do them.

  • Jim O'Neill

    Next piece of data on the attempt to use CloudReady on an old Netbook - I reinstalled Linux Mint and got very similar numbers for internet connections speeds as I got with CloudReady.I measured 1.44Mbps when I was about 30' from the router, 23Mbps when I was right next to it, and 19 through a wired connection.  I'd love to compare with Windows but I am having some trouble re-installing it, the XP DVD keeps aborting the install because it thinks there is something wrong with the hard drive. So right now I'm wiping the disk before trying to load XP again.

  • Forrest Smith

    Thanks for the info - similar results to Mint are reassuring and what we'd expect - same drivers are probably at play.

     

    Windows may have proprietary versions of the drivers for wifi or graphics which could affect load speed or sluggish UI elements respectively.

  • Jim O'Neill

    Just rechecked the numbers and there was a difference between wireless performance running Linux Mint vs CloudReady.  Next to the router, I got 23Mbps running Linux, and 10Mbps running CloudReady.  Strangely though, the wired speed was greater running CloudReady (26Mbps) than under Mint (19Mbps).

  • Forrest Smith

    Could be incoming fluctuations in your local incoming web speed? Repeat trials might be called for to say conclusively.

     

    If you know what wifi hardware you're using I could look into if there're any changes to drivers in upstream kernels or something. 

  • Jim O'Neill

    An update on my Netbook.  I re-installed Windows XP, it was quite a lengthy process as there were 100's of updates to apply.  But running XP I do see better internet connection speeds compared to both Linux Mint and CloudReady.

    I tested all three operating systems the same way. Firstly wireless performance about 30' from the the router where the wireless signal is weak, then wireless performance right next to the router, and then finally wired internet performance.

    The results running XP on these three tests were 3Mbps, 20Mbps and 42Mbps respectively.

    On Mint in the same order, 1Mbps, 23Mbps and 19Mbps.

    On Cloudready, 1Mbps, 10Mbps and 26Mbps.

    So CloudReady was the worst of the three on wireless performance.

    When I was downloading the drivers for XP from Acer's website, I noticed they did have Linux drivers for both the wired and wireless LAN chips.  Would these drivers already be built into CloudReady and Mint, or could they offer a potential improvement to closer to the Windows XP performance level.  I'm happy to try installing those drivers if you can give me some guidance how to do it.  I know I can get to the Linux command line by typing Ctrl-Alt-F2 but I don't know Linux well enough to  install a driver.

     

     

     

  • Jim O'Neill

    I should perhaps also say how I tested the speeds.  I used Rogers Speed Check, which is a variant on the Ookla test branded by my ISP, Rogers.

    I only reported download speeds because upload speeds are throttled by my ISP to 10Mbps, so except for the tests done far from the router all the operating systems would achieve the same result of 10Mbps for upload speed.

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