Unbelievably reckless installation tool

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21 comments

  • Phil Reilly

    It always installs to /SDA, as in Shoulda Done A complete backup!

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  • Steve F

    So you are defending a secret process that never says what it is going to do and never confirms the drive in advance.  And it is my fault for not checking with you to find out what is does?  And did I say I never had a backup? No, I never said that.  You just assumed that. You have a heck of an attitude. But you ignore the point this is a reckless tool. You could care less about that, right?  That must be part of the NEVERWARE culture which explains a lot.  So thanks for supporting the point that it is basically a malicious installation process and apparently from people who don't care! 

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  • Joseph

    Steve,

    It does say before installing to backup

     

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  • Steve F

    Thanks for making my point.  Nowhere in that screen image you posted does it say WHICH hard drive or which partition!  While this may be OK to people who may have some weird motivation to perpetuate this reckless installer, it is not OK with anyone who has common sense.  Since this is apparently a version of linux, all linux installers specify the target drive and partition.  This installer, as you have proven, does NOT.   It DOES say at the end in that image above 'we'll guide you through the installation in ...easy steps'.  That does not happen.  The reckless, malicious installer immediately goes ahead and destroys data.  So what is your point?  Do you not understand this?  People who think this is OK are getting close to the mindset of people who think it is OK to scam people with ransomware since they should have known better.  But your image proves this installer lies about guiding anyone though the process.  DATA IS DESTROYED without permission and without notice since it says the user will be guided through in easy steps and that does not happen!  Whether or not anyone has made a backup is irrelevant.  You're saying it is OK to intentionally destroy data and make people recover from backup?  Wow!  What an attitide. The fact remains, this installer is intentionally malicious.   

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  • Courtney

    If you have 2 hard drives you can manually tell it to to install to the second hard drive from the command prompt. If not then it will automatically over write the first hard drive it detects. 

    Then you are correct this linux but there is no regular linux installation screen. Cloudready is based off of chromium OS which is the open source version of chrome OS & uses chrome OS'S standardized features & processes. 

    If you had a chromebook & needed to reput/reinstall chrome OS on it it automatically wipes the hard drive clean & does a clean install automatically. It's process that's built into chrome OS & chromium OS. Every version of chromium OS & chrome OS does this by default. Chromium OS & chrome OS wasn't designed by google to be a typical linux. Google designed chromium OS & chrome OS to be heavily locked down. 

    Yeah I can agree it's not OK but there is a warning message as shown in the picture.

    Also it takes up 27 partions why no idea it's just the way google designed the OS. All cloudready did was take googles chromium OS & make it available to everyone. So truthfully if anything it is on google not neverware/cloudready.

    Though I will say they should at least give 2 warning messages or be a bit more detailed on the process.

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  • Steve F

    It says you will be "guided through" in  'EASY STEPS".  It does not say data will immediately be destroyed - IT SAYS YOU WILL BE GUIDED THROUGH.   It does not say that 'Easy Steps' means you can somehow go to a command line and give some secret commands.  You people simply do not get it.  Not even remotely.  This is a malicious installer and even more so if it is not fixed immediately because it adds support to the fact Neverware simply does not care.  Exactly how hard is it to just disclose what is going to occur like probably every other installer in the world does?  Seriously?  And everyone here has to debate this?  Unbelievable!  And your policy that it is OK to trash people's data and make them recover as part of your product learning process is sick. So sick.  And you are now trying to blame this mess on Google or Chrome OS.  But somebody had to customize the screen that says 'CLOUDREADY INSTALLER'.  Google did not put that in there.  It's your baby people.  Change the diapers.

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  • Joseph

    Steve you are making this hard. Yes I agree there should be a option to select a Drive but this is Like Chrome OS and I don't think they have rights to change the installation process. Though I do think if you go into your bios you can set whatever hard drive you want to be primary 1 and install CR that way I think or otherwise you'll have to open the desktop up and disconnect other drives but the one you want to use CR for. Now if this is a laptop then that part is not needed unless you have several hdds

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  • Courtney

    I will at least give you that one. 

    Once again it is how google designed the OS. Neverware/cloudready wants to be authentic as possible to the actual chrome OS & the process is built in by default from google. Yeah they can add stuff to it & change it up but this is chromium OS/chrome OS not your typical linux. 

    Google designed the OS to do that by default I am not saying you couldn't change it up but then it really wouldn't be chromium OS anymore & might as well turn it into a regular linux. Chrome OS was designed to store info in multiple partions. Which is why there is a total of 27 partions made. If you all condense it into one might as well just create your own linux from scratch since it wouldn't be chromium OS anymore it wouldn't have that security that chrome OS/chromium OS has by it being on multiple partions. 

    No offense or anything but I can understand why you are upset & get where you are coming from. I am just trying to help you out by explaining the facts. I am not trying to be rude or anything & apologize if I do come off of as rude but it truly is googles fault for making a process that deletes & wipes your hard drive clean automatically. 

    I am guessing google never thought anyone else would want to use chromium OS or chrome OS for that matter it's been a built in process since chromebooks came out. 

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  • Joseph

    Well Courtney after All this Is a OS that anyone can try to install and some may have issues like here no Offense OP

    It's just when people see a terminal they all just freak out and want something simple. Yes I do agree they should of thought to add a option to select a drive so yeah. Just most Chromebooks don't have second drives 

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  • Courtney

    Yeah that's true

    I mean they did have dual boot before they removed it & that was custom made by them. So I can't see why they couldn't custom make a installer to add a partion or drive select. Though dual boot did require a good size portion 32GB to install.

    Though thing is they want the installation process to be as simple as possible & what's not as simple as pressing a button once & your done. Cloudready was also made with simplicity in mind. I at least agree with the OP on the fact they could be a bit more detailed on the warning screen & not say maybe & change it to will delete all your data or something or make a second confirmation screen saying it will delete all your data there's no going back.

    Truthfully it would be simpler to probably add in a second warning screen or change up the first warning screen. Then reconfigure the whole thing to boot a GUI partion or drive selector. Though a partion selector wouldn't work would have to reconfigure googles process of wiping the whole drive as well. Though imagine they probably could as well due having dual boot in the past. 

    Though that leaves a question is it worth it in the end to waste the time & money to reconfigure something in neverwares case probably not they are a small team after all. It's not like they have hundreds of people like google or Microsoft. So think that's another reason for sticking with the simplicity as well. 

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  • Steve F

    Here are a few more FACTS.  Chromium OS is open source and you know that. You have the source code.  You also have a staff of developers and engineers all listed on your website and you know that.  Are they all simply writing screens that say fake things like EASY STEPS?   Or can they actually read the code and make customizations?  You know they can.  You also customize your installer and then deceive people with fake language like being guided through in EASY STEPS and you know that.  You have a website with the installation steps itemized where none of these excuses with unix language you suddenly have a proliferation of are not listed but could be. You are simply full of it and rely on the ignorance of your customers to spew the ridiculous excuses for your defective installer. But your customers should be very skeptical of an organization with a staff so dedicated to refusing to fix a serious defect that is so easy to fix. By now you probably could have updated your website with a learn more like and explain how the installer works and the advanced  options.  But no!  Why don't you just do it?  What upsets me is that this is so easy to fix and Neverware insists on making it dangerous and difficult.

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  • Courtney

    Well truthfully I will say one last thing it is easy steps it's completely simple click a button & 123 it's installed. The target audience is not advanced people the target audience is people who own low end pcs, laptops, & tablets. That arn't all that tech savvy & don't want the hassle of trying to get something installed. It's also meant toward schools as well it's a cheap & quick solution for schools to set up & hassle free as well or in general anyone that wants the simplicity of a chromebook.

    truthfully the way cloudready's GUI installer is set up it's set up like a actual chromebook though. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGNFoug22M0 You just boot up the USB installer on your chromebook & it installs it like it's brand new. So truthfully it's what neverware/cloudready where going for to be as simple as a actual chromebook.

    A chromebook was never meant to have a GUI installer it was meant more for only recovery purposes not be able to select a drive. Yes I get & can agree they can create a gui installer but like I said goal is simplicity here. If you watched that video it's straight forward clean install of the actual chrome OS it's plain & simple no hassle no anything which is the aim here. 

    If you want to be advanced there is guides to install from the command prompt/terminal. Though thing is if you install from the command terminal it will still wipe your hard drive 100% no way around it because that's how it was designed. To be a quick & simple recovery of an actual chromebook & that is the same process used in chromium OS to install it on a everyday computer as well. 

    The ability to manually be able to create your own partions or choose a partion has to be built from the ground up. Since all the installer is currently is the recovery installer you see in the video just with a different UI & ability to run the OS from a USB. 

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  • Courtney

    Also here is a link to the actual chromium OS Website 

    https://chromium.googlesource.com/chromiumos/docs/+/master/developer_guide.md 

    Everything you want to know about chromium OS is in that website.

    http://www.chromium.org/chromium-os

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  • Steve F

    It's only about the defective installer that says it will guide you through when it really does not. Instead, it immediately trashes your data without disclosure of the drive or permission to trash the drive.  It could easily say click here for information on advanced installation options which could easily go to the website with documentation on command-line installation or provide more menu-driven options in the installer.  It could also indicate the target installation drive which it has selected.  But NO!  Neverware insists saying you will be guided through in easy steps. And by the way, cigarettes do not cause cancer and the earth is flat.  Why not put those statements in your installer as long it is making fake claims anyway?  It would fit right in with being guided in easy steps.  As it stands it is defective and dishonest and incredibly easy to fix.  And supported by a group of people who seem so removed from fixing something so easy to fix.  And nobody seems to understand if you use a CLI it does not do that same thing as the defective installer.  With a CLI, you will know what drive is the target drive.  Not so with the defective installer. You guys really don't get this, do you?  

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  • Joseph

    Maybe CR could add a UI or GIF to warn you about the format and in big bold letters....

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  • Joseph

    Yeah Courtney when it comes to terminal stuff people aren't use to it. It's like going back in the 80's just saying...

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  • Steve F

    Exactly, a warning screen that identifies the target drive and possibly a link to the website instructions for command line installation.  A few people will use the CLI. Like IT staff at a school district.  Or anyone doing something slightly different than a laptop single drive might want to consider the CLI.

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  • Courtney

    @ joseph I know & I am saying the idea is simplicity & not meant for more advanced users. All the advanced stuff is done through the command terminal & listed how to in step to step guides.

    Anyway @ steve blah I can admit I was getting a bit overboard probably why I really don't come on & only from time to time. So I apologize truthfully I get to caught up into stuff. Once again I apologize don't realize what I am doing most of the time until I calm down lol. So I apologize for going on a long rant & realize it was my bad 100% completely.

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  • Joseph

    I mean I myself can do the steps just fine. I'm in my 30's so ha. I've tagged along the Linux train a bit and I understand some things so yeah I find y'alls tutorials good to follow. Just I see where the OP is coming from

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  • Peter Smulders

    As a technically aware old fart, I'll contribute that the OP is right in that the first screen should really say "this is a rather single-minded installer, that is meant for very straightforward install or recovery and it will install on the very first drive it finds.

    If you:

    * Have multiple drives OR

    * Have any sort of data on any drive or partition in this machine that you care about OR

    * Want to tailor the install in a few ways

    STOP RIGHT NOW, read this, this and this and use the command line installer."

     

    Now this is probably a design choice somewhere along the way in order not to scare or intimidate 95% of the intended audience (i.e. non-pro owners of old hardware, which are found in education environments in abundance), but it would have saved you, I dare to assume, loss of some precious data. For what it's worth, I agree that there should be a big warning in the GUI installer exactly about this.

    Now for your unrelenting ranting about perceived evil: there is no malicious intent here, same as a cookie cutter has no more malicious intent than the pastry chef's knife: it is made to do one thing and one thing only; the installer (and the command line isn't really all that much more civilised) is a blunt force tool to do a blunt force job and it does it in the bare-bones most efficient possible method. (it is literally little more than a loop of dd commands that copy over partitions)

     

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