QEMU/KVM support

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10 comments

  • Forrest Smith

    We run qemu kvm on our engineering team for local VMs but I'm not sure if our production images support this usage by default.
    What kind of environment are you trying this in? And what config or parameters are you booting the image with?

    You may want to try passing a USB bootable CloudReady USB (a real one) to a blank disk VM and see if you can boot that VM from the USB to run our install

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  • James LaBarre

    Shouldn't you be able to convert the image file to a bootable USB or ISO image, and not have to write it out to a USB device in the first place?  (It will not work as an image by itself).

     

    EDIT: tried a few possibilities, useless as usual.

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  • Forrest Smith

    Unfortunately we're stuck working with one another and limited knowledge, so what *should* be possible and what we can figure out may not 100% overlap.

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  • ml8

    I firstly booted a Ubuntu Live instance, installed Etcher into it, and then use it to burn the provided iso to VHD B. And then I tried to boot the VHD B with both bios and uemi (ovmf), never worked, keep stucking at bios boot screen. I also tried to mount a VHD with nbd and burn it with Ether, doesn't work as well. Booting iso directly never worked as well.

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  • Forrest Smith

    I ping'd our engineers to see if they can offer any secret tricks, but it is possible that the peculiar graphics stack on CloudReady will make this tough to accomplish. Hopefully I can offer you more info soon.

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  • Nicholas Bishop

    The only QEMU graphics that CloudReady supports is virtio, so try adding "-vga virtio" to your command line. I have found that the SDL display works best; add "-display sdl,gl=on" for that. Note that not all Linux distros build QEMU with SDL or OpenGL support. You can also add "-usb -device usb-tablet -show-cursor" for better mouse interaction.

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  • James LaBarre

    Setting "video" to "virtio".  That was the trick. 

    Create a primary virtual HDD of the size you want, set the installer image file as the second HDD (I had renamed it from *.bin to *.raw).  Make sure you have the boot menu enabled and both HDDs are set as boot items.  When you boot, select the second HDD (the CloudReady image) and when the desktop loads, run the install.  After it's done and shuts down, remove the 2nd HDD (installer image). 

     

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  • Capuccino

    Heads up, KVM support was already included in more recent Chromium versions.

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  • James LaBarre

    One other tip for booting in a QEMU/KVM VM (I'm using virt-manager at the moment).  When creating the VM, tell it you're using an existing virtual disk image (you'll create it next) rather than saying you're using an ISO.  When you're "selecting" your disk image, you can create the image there.  Once you've stepped through the new VM setup, tell it you mant to customize the setup before booting.  You'll add another storage item, defined as a USB type, and you point to the CloudReady image.  Make sure the "USB drive" is set as the first boot, and start the VM.

    Of course, at least with CR v83, the video is SO flakey (this is using VirtIO) that the taskbar keeps crashing, and you can't actually install.  So still broken anyway.  Maybe there's a way to force it into a shell, and maybe there's a command-line call for running the install.  Would have to hunt that down.

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  • James LaBarre

    Nope, that doesn't work either.  I found the directions here for a command line install, and they fail as well.  The "Ctrl-Alt-T" option does nothing (never brings up a command window).  Logging into the desktop (the one with the taskbar that crashes every second) then using "Ctrl-Alt-F2" gets a command window, but it just keeps sending stray keystrokes.  You can't delete the stray keystrokes fast enough to log in, and if you just let it sit, you will end up with a couple lines of question marks.  So it's feeding unwanted data into the VM.

    So still no way to test new builds before installing on physical hardware.  About the only thing I can say about Cloudready over FydeOS is that FydeOS won't even boot in a VM (I don't think it even booted on physical hardware, last time I tried).  Only advantage with that is you abandon the effort as a waste of time that much earlier (Cloudready gioves the false impression it will actually work).

     

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